Dissertation (Metadaten)
Titel:Importance of nutrient supply (N, P, K) for yield formation and nutrient use efficiency of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) compared to sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) including an assessment to grow safflower under north German conditions
 
Autor:Jehad Abbadi
 
URN:NBN:urn:nbn:de:gbv:8-diss-26181
 
Fakultät:Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaftliche Fakultät
DDC Sachgebiet:580 Pflanzen (Botanik)
 
Datum der mdl. Prüfung:08.11.2007
 
Referent(in):PD. Dr. Jóska Gerendás
Korreferent(en) Korreferentin:Prof. Dr. Friedhelm Taube
 
Beschreibung (original):Safflower represents an important oil crop internationally and may have a certain production potential under German conditions, particularly in organic farming where the putatively low nutrient requirement is highly welcomed. Current knowledge regarding the nutrient require-ments of safflower as compared to similar oil crops is limited. However safflower was held worthy under German conditions in the beginning of this century, it was thus the aim of this study to determine the response of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) as compared to sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in terms of growth, yield, and nutrient use efficiencies with respect to NPK supply in pot experiments using soil mixture. A further nutrient solution experiment with respect to P was conducted. A field experiment was done to screen ten safflower cultivars ((1) Sabina, (2) PI-572475/Saffire, (3) PI-209286, (4) PI-253518, (5) PI-253555, (6) BS-62915, (7) BS-62924, (8) CART-19/89, (9) DO-13/03 and (10) DO-15/03) for yield under low input organic farming under northern German conditions. Both species responded strongly to increasing N supply with respect to plant growth and yield. Growth and yield of safflower increased up to 1 g N per pot for safflower, while the optimum for sunflower was 2.0 g N per pot. Safflower out-yielded sunflower at low N sup-ply, while at high N level the opposite was observed. Pearson coefficients indicate that in safflower, yield is tightly correlated with the number of capitula per plant and the mass per achene, while these two yield components are tightly correlated to each other. To the con-trary, sunflower yield was most tightly correlated with the number of achenes per capitulum, followed by the mass per achene. Path coefficient analysis considering the most important traits determining oil yield revealed that in sunflower, the number of achenes per capitulum exerts a strong direct effect on oil yield, and compensatory effects with the number of capitula per plant and the number of achenes per capitulum are not important. For safflower direct effects of the achene and leaf N content as well as the leaf dry matter are small, and mediated principally via the indirect effect on the number of achenes per capitulum. Both species accumulated similar amounts of N per pot at equivalent N supplies, but safflower was better N accumulator (concentrator) than sunflower due to safflower’s less dry matter. Safflower utilizes absorbed N more efficiently than sunflower to produce achene yield at suboptimal N supply in terms of efficiency ratio and utilization index, but the opposite holds true at optimal and high supply. The efficiency to use accumulated N for dry matter and achene production interpreted in terms of Michaelis-Menten kinetics reveals the low Cmin and Km value in safflower compared to sunflower. It can be concluded that in terms of N availability safflower represents a low input crop and outperforms sunflower with respect to achene yield on soils low in available N. Both species responded strongly to increasing P levels in terms of plant growth and yield. Growth and yield of safflower increased up to 1 g P per pot, while the optimum for sunflower was 0.5 g P per pot only. Supply of P affected safflower yield mainly through increasing number of capitula per plant and number of achenes per capitulum was reduced at very low P supply. Sunflower yield was improved with increasing P supply through increased number of achenes per capitulum only. Yield component analysis reveals that, oil yield in safflower was affected by P deficiency mainly due to number of capitulum per plant followed by the number of achenes per capitulum followed by single achene mass (SAM), but contribution of oil content to overall yield variation was insignificant. Sunflower major yield component influencing oil yield was number of achenes per plant, followed by SAM without a significant contribution of the oil content. Pearson correlations, followed by path coefficient analysis indicate that in sunflower only total N accumulated was found to be most important, while in safflower the total amount of P and N accumulated showed the highest standardized partial regression coefficient. Sunflower accumulated much more P (mg/pot) than safflower at all equivalent P supplies especially at low levels, but both accumulated the same P amounts at their individual optimal supplies. Uptake efficiency (mg P accumulated (mg P provided)-1) was higher in sunflower than safflower at all equivalent P supplies including their optimal levels. Agronomic efficiency interpreted as g P required producing fixed amount of achenes (in soil experiment), or DM (in nutrient solution experiment) was higher in safflower than sunflower at optimal and suboptimal P supply indicating the superiority of sunflower in term of the efficiency to use external P supply to produce achenes and DM than safflower. Sunflower was much more efficient at their optimal and suboptimal P supplies to utilize absorbed P than safflower in term of efficiency ratio (g achene (g P accumulated)-1) and utilization index (g achene / (g P (g DM)-1). From the nutrient solution experiment, the DM response curves based on accumulated P (mg P pot-1) (efficiency ratio (ER)), and P concentration in DM (mg P (g DM)-1) (utilization index (UI)) interpreted in terms of Michaelis-Menten kinetics reveals that Km didn’t differ for both species in terms of ER, but sunflower had les Km value in term of UI. It can be concluded that safflower has a high requirement for P with respect to growth and yield; sunflower is more efficient than safflower in term of uptake and utilization of P at optimal and sub-optimal P supplies indicating that safflower cannot be considered as a low nutrient input crop in terms of phosphorus. Both species responded strongly to increasing K supply with respect to plant growth and yield. Growth and yield of safflower increased up to 1 g K per pot, while the optimum for sunflower was 3.0 g K per pot. Safflower out-yielded sunflower at low K supply, while at high K level the opposite was observed. The number of capitula in safflower was only slightly affected by K supply and the number of achenes per capitulum was only reduced under severe K deficiency, while single achene mass increased with increasing K supply. To the contrary, in sunflower, the number of achenes per capitulum strongly responded to the K supply, as did the single achene mass. Oil yield in safflower was affected by K deficiency mainly due to reduced achene yield, not oil concentration. To the contrary, oil yield in sunflower was severely affected by low K supply due to both reduced achene yield and lower oil concentration. Multiple regression analysis indicate that in sunflower, the stem DM and the total amount of K accumulated in DM was most important, while in safflower the total amount of K and N accumulated had the highest impact. Both species accumulated similar amounts of total K in whole shoots per pot at low, equal K supply, except at extremely low K levels where safflower out-yielded sunflower. K concentration in safflower tissues was significantly lower than in sunflower at optimal and suboptimal K levels. Safflower utilizes absorbed K more efficiently than sunflower to produce achene yield at suboptimal and optimal K supply in terms of efficiency ratio, but only at suboptimal K availability when considering the utilization index. In terms of Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics addressing nutrient response curve to use K for growth and yield, Km was higher in sunflower than in safflower, while the K accumulation required initiating yield formation (Cmin) in safflower was significantly lower. Similarly, safflower required much less external K to produce a given amount of achenes than sunflower at low and optimal K supplies. It can be concluded that in terms of K availability safflower represents a low input crop and outperforms sunflower on soils low in available K. In the field experiments, the highest oil yielding cultivars were cultivar 3, and cultivar 8, while the least yielding cultivars were cultivars 2, 9, and 10. Yield component analysis reveals that the achene capitulum-1 had the major influence on the variation of the oil yield of the ten cultivars under study (pooled) followed by capitula plant-1 followed by TAM, while the oil concentration had slightly negative influence, and the plant density influencing oil yield negatively. Oil yield ha-1 was strongly reduced even for the best yielding cultivars due to low achene yield and low oil concentration. As these two yield components are largely influenced by the environmental conditions at maturity, the required temperature and the sunshine duration needed for safflower to perform optimally for achene filling and oil formation was not reached. In addition to high humidity and continuous rainfall at period of maturity affected achene quality and increased disease incidence causing reduction in oil yield. Although two years are not enough to analyse the performance of safflower adaptabil-ity to certain region, cultivar 3, and 8 may have a production potential in Northern Germany, but further trials using the ten cultivars are needed. The most striking contribution from yield components to the variation of yield came from the number of achene per capitulum which must be given attention to tune safflower cultivation to provide the period of formation of this yield component more suitable climatic conditions in further research at the area of study.
 
(übersetzt):Saflor zählt international zu den wichtigen Ölfrüchten. In Deutschland könnte Saflor, bedingt durch den vermuteten niedrigen Nährstoffbedarf, im biologischen Landbau eine gewisse Bedeutung erlangen. Zur Zeit ist der tatsächliche Nährstoffbedarf jedoch unzureichend charakterisiert. Ziel dieser Studie war es daher, die Nährstoff-, Ertags- und Wachstumseffizienz von Saflor (Carthamus tinctorius L.) mit Sonnenblume (Helianthus annuus L.) in bezug auf die Versorgung mit N, P und K im Gefäßversuch zu vergleichen. Ergänzend wurde ein Nährlösungsversuch zur näheren Charakterisierung der P-Effiziens durchgeführt. Zwei Feldversuche fanden auf dem Versuchsgut Lindhöft (Breite: 54.45, Länge: 9.97, Höhe: 15 m) auf Lehm-Sandboden statt. Zehn Saflorsorten (1) Sabina, (2) PI-572475/Saffire, (3) PI-209286, (4) PI-253518, (5) PI 253555, (6) BS-62924, (8) CART-19/89, (9) DO-13/03 und (10) DO-15/03 wurden nach den regeln des biologischen Landbaus angebaut. Beide Pflanzenarten reagierten stark auf ein erhöhtes N-Angebot. Wachstum und Ertrag von Saflors waren bei N-Gaben von 0,1 g pro Gefäß am höchsten, bei Sonnenblume war dies bei 2,0 g N der Fall. Bei Saflor zeichnet sich ein besserer Ertrag bei niedrigen N-Gaben im Vergleich zu Sonnenblume ab. Das Entgegengesetzte wurde bei hohem N-Niveau beobachtet. Bei der Ertragskomponentenanalyse (YCA) zeigte sich der größte Einfluss durch die N-Versorgung auf die Anzahl der Körbe (Blütenköpfe) pro Pflanze, gefolgt vom Tausendkorngewicht (TKG). Dagegen wurde beim Sonnenblumenertrag der größte Einfluss auf die Samenanzahl pro Korb gefolgt vom Tausendkorngewicht festgestellt. Beide Arten bekamen eine gleiche N-Versorgung, hatten die gleiche N-Akkumulation an N Verstehe ich nicht. Die geringere Trockensubstanzproduktion von Saflor gestattete eine besserer N-Akkumulator(im Sinne höherer N-Konzentrationen) als Sonnenblume. Bei beiden Pflanzenarten hatten die gleiche Aufnahmeeffizienz (mg N aufgenommen (mg N Angebot)-1) bei niedrigem und hohem N-Angebot. Die N-Ausnutzungseffiziens (efficiency ratio, utilization index) hinsichtlich des Samenertrages ist bei niedrigem N-Angebot bei Saflor höher als bei Sonnenblumen. Bei optimalen und hohem N-Angebot wurden entgegengesetzten Effekte beobachtet. Saflor benötigt weniger ‘external N’ bei der niedrigen N-Stufe für die Produktion einer bestimmten Samenmenge als Sonnenblume, während bei dem jeweiligen optimalen N-Angebot das‘external N requirement’ gleich war. Für die Interpretation der Nutzungseffizienz wurden die Michaelis-Menten Gleichung für die Nährstoffaufnahme, sowie für den Samen- und Trockenmasseertrag benutzt. Im bezug auf die N-Ausnutzung bestätigt die MM-Kinetik die höhere Effizienz des Saflors bei niedrigem Km in bezug auf die TM und des Samenertrags. Der cmin-Wert hinsichtlich des Samen- und Ölertrages war bei Saflor geringer. Abschließend kann in bezug auf die N-Versorgung gesagt werden, dass Saflor hinsichtlich des Samen- und Ölertrages mit einem geringen N-Angebot auskommt als Sonnenblume. Beide Sorten reagierten stark auf die Steigerung der P Gaben. Wachstum und Ertrag des Saflors waren bei einer P-Gabe von 1,0 g maximal, bei Sonnenblume war dies bei 0,5 g P der Fall. Die Sonnenblumen weisen bei niedrigen und hohem P-Angebot einen höheren Ertrag auf. Der Ölertrag bei Saflor reagierte auf P-Mangel durch die Anzahl der Körbe pro Pflanze, gefolgt von der Samenanzahl pro Korb, sowie der Samenmasse. Der Einfluss unterschiedlicher Ölkonzentrationen war hinsichtlich der Ertragsveränderung bedeutungslos. Der Einfluss der P-Versorgung auf den Ölertrag von Sonnenblume manifestierte sich insbesondere durch den Einfluss auf die Anzahl der Samen pro Pflanze, gefolgt vom Tausendkorngewicht, während die Ölkonzentration wiederum ohne Einfluss war. Die P-Akkumulation (mg P Topf-1) war bei gleicher P-Versorgung bei Sonnenblume höher als bei Saflor, insbesondere bei niedrigem P-Angebot. In der jeweiligen optimalen Versorgungsstufe akkumulierten die Kulturen die gleichen P-Menge. Sonnenblume hatte eine höhere Aufnahmeeffizienz (mg P aufgenommen (mg P Angebot)-1) im vergleich zu Saflor. Dies fand sich bei allen P-Versorgungsstufen. Im Nährlösungsversuch wies Sonnenblume, bei gleichem P-Angebot, eine höhere P-Akkumulation (mg P Topf-1) sowie Ausnutzung (mg P aufgenommen (mg P Angebot)-1) auf. Sonnenblume zeigte bei optimaler P-Versorgung eine höhere Effizienz (efficiency ratio, utilization index). Bei sehr niedrigem P-Angebot zeigt Saflor ein höheres ‘efficiency ratio’ als Sonnenblume, was man als Verdünnungseffekt ansehen kann, wenn wir es als ‘utilization index’ interpretieren. Die P-Verwertung von Sonnenblume, bewertet als efficiency ratio und utilization index, ist bei moderatem Angebot höher als bei Saflor Letzteres benötigt ein höheres externes P-Angebot als Sonnenblume bei optimaler und niedriger Versorgung um einen bestimmten Samenertrag zu erzeugen. Im Nährlösungsversuch wies Saflor ein höheres ‘external P requirement’ auf als Sonnenblume um eine bestimmte Trockenmasse zu produzieren. Im Nährlösungsversuch wies die Trockensubstanzkurve von Sonnenblume einen geringeren Km auf als bei Saflor. Abschließend kann in bezug auf die P-Versorgung gesagt werden, dass Saflor einen höheren Bedarf als Sonnenblume hat, wobei letztere eine höhere Effizienz besitzt. Beide Sorten reagierten stark auf die Steigerung der K-Gaben. Wachstum und Ertrag des Saflors waren bei Gaben von 1,0 g K pro Gefäß maximal, bei Sonnenblume war dies bei 3,0 g K der Fall. Bei Saflor zeichnet sich ein besserer Ertrag bei niedrigen K-Gaben im Vergleich zu Sonnenblume ab. Das Entgegengesetzte wurde bei hohem K-Niveau beobachtet. In bezug auf die K-Mangelversorgung war der Ölertrag bei Saflor niedriger, wegen des verringerten Samenertrags. Auf die Ölkonzentration hatte dies keinen Einfluss. Bei der Ertragskomponentenanalyse zeigt sich, dass der Samenertrag durch das Gewicht pro Same beeinflusst wird, gefolgt von der Anzahl Körben pro Pflanze. Die Zahl der Samen pro Korb hatte einen geringfügig negativen Einfluss auf den Samenertrag. Im Gegensatz dazu reagierte der Ölertrag von Sonnenblume besonders stark auf eine niedrige K-Versorgung, welches mit dem verringerten Samenertrag und der niedrigen Ölkonzentration korrespondiert. Die Ertragskomponentenanalyse zeigt, das der Samenertrag durch die Anzahl der Samen pro Korb beeinflusst wird, gefolgt vom Tausendkorngewicht. Beide Arten akkumulierten bei niedrigem K-Angebot ähnliche Mengen. Unterschiede gab es nur bei extrem niedrigem Kalium, da zeigte Saflor eine höhere K-Akkumulation. Saflor hat bei allen K-Versorgungsstufen eine höher Ausnutzung an K (interpretiert als ‘efficiency ratio’) hinsichtlich des Samenertrages als Sonnenblume. In bezug auf den ‘utilization index’ war Saflor nur bei der niedrigen Versorgung überlegen. Saflor benötigt bei allen K-Versorgungsstufen deutlich weniger ‘external K’ um einen bestimmten Samenertrag zu erzeugen. Der aus der Ertragskurve abgeleitete Km war bei Sonnenblume höher als bei Saflor, wogegen für den cmin gegenteilige Beobachtungen gelten. Dies zeigt, dass Saflor eine höhere K-Effizienz hinsichtlich des Ölertrag besitzt. Im Feldversuch hatte die Sorte 3 und 8 den höchsten Ölertrag, dagegen hatten die Sorten 2, 9 und 10 den geringsten. Die Ertragskomponentenanalyse über alle Sorten (‘pooled’) zeigt, dass die Samenanzahl pro Korb den Haupteinfluss auf den Ölertrag bei allen 10 Sorten hat, gefolgt von der Korbanzahl pro Pflanze, und dem Tausendkorngewicht (TKG). Die Ölkonzentration war schwach negativ mit dem Ölertrag assoziiert, wie auch die Pflanzendichte. Selbst für die Sorten mit den höchsten Erträgen (Sorte 3 und 8), war aufgrund des geringen Samenertrages und der niedrigen Ölkonzentration der Ölertrag niedrig. Diese zwei Ertragskomponenten sind durch die Witterung während der Samenreife beeinflusst. Die Samenreife benötigt warme Temperaturen und längere Sonnenscheindauer für die optimale Samenbildung und Ölanreicherung, dies wurde in Norddeutschland nicht erreicht. Zusätzlich wurde die Samenqualität durch hohe Luftfeuchtigkeit, anhaltenden Regen und daraus folgendem Krankheitsbefall negativ beeinflusst. Die Anzahl an Samen pro Korb ist die Ertragkomponente, welche den größten Effekt auf den Ertrag hatte. Darauf sollte bei der Züchtung angepasster Genotypen die größte Beachtung gelegt werden.
 
Schlagworte:Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium, Fertilization, Safflower, Sunflower,Yield components, Nutrient use efficiency, Yield response curve, Helianthus annuus L., Carthamus tinctorius L.
 
Dokumente: